Origin of "Pride and Prejudice"

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by River Ape, Apr 2, 2018.

  1. River Ape Valued Senior Member

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    Does the phrase "Pride and Prejudice" pre-date the Jane Austen novel (1813) of that title? Was the author using a pre-existing expression? Does anyone have any information?
     
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  5. River Ape Valued Senior Member

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    Well discovered, Dave!

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    But of course, this begs the question: was the expression new to Fanny Burney in 1782?

    You see the actual contiguous words "pride and prejudice" occur in Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" (1776), not really as an expression; but simply, so to speak, in the flow of his text. It seemed unlikely to me that this could have been Austen's source but I knew of no other; now I am sure the Telegraph explanation is correct.

    So did Fanny Burney take the words from the recent bestseller by Thomas Paine? And who is to say that they were original to Paine anyway? Any suggestions?
     
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  7. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Nope. My Google Fu is depleted.
     
  8. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    When in doubt, assume that Shakespeare said it first. Or at least he was often the first to write it down.
     

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