Physics/Math References

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by BenTheMan, Nov 12, 2007.

  1. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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  3. awesome guys!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  5. JohnM1 Registered Member

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    It's awesome

    Thanks for providing this link. It's very useful for me and my students. I have downloaded.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2010
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  7. Eagle9 Registered Senior Member

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    Good day

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    I need to find some technical data in scientific journals and I hope that people here acknowledged with science will be able to help me.
    1. The tensile strength of carbon nanotubes and Aerogels, what it is equal to?
    2. The general and basic information about Space Elevator.
    3. Amount of Space Debris, especially at very high altitudes, such as 40 000 km and higher.
    4. The amount of Solar constant near the Earth
    5. Data about Young's modulus for various materials.
    I KNOW that these data are available in internet; however I was asked to use the references from textbooks or peer-reviewed materials. Can you help me in it?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  8. Pete It's not rocket surgery Moderator

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    Your best bet is to ask a librarian for help.
     
  9. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    You should be able to get E values for most materials from Machinery's Handbook and/ or Kempe's.
    But, unless you want considerable amounts of other engineering data you'd be better off downloading tables from the 'web.
    Both of those books are fairly expensive and have a large page count.

    Here's a good start:
    http://www.matweb.com/search/PropertySearch.aspx
     
  10. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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  11. eram Sciengineer Valued Senior Member

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  12. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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  13. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks Trooper. Leonard Susskind. I like listening to Leonard Susskind in the same way I like listening to Richard Feynman when they discuss physics.
     
  14. Cheezle Hab SoSlI' Quch! Registered Senior Member

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  15. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Hey it's the day after Christmas. Thanks for that. Looks like cosmology for me. For some folks posting here the 'Introduction to Logic Gates' might be helpful. Me to.
     
  16. Cheezle Hab SoSlI' Quch! Registered Senior Member

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  17. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Good links. He's at MIT with Alan Guth. Looks like he's especially interested in the experimental aspects of modern cosmology. Reading his bio. Thanks.
     
  18. Cheezle Hab SoSlI' Quch! Registered Senior Member

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    The Mechanical Universe

    This is a science series that originally aired on PBS in the 1980s and was produced by the California Institute of Technology. The video quality is about what you would expect from video tape. Content is much better than the new Cosmos program but also has a different intended audience. 52 programs or 30 minutes each. Enjoy.

    http://www.learner.org/resources/series42.html?pop=yes&pid=611

    Be sure to also check out the other resources there: http://www.learner.org/resources/browse.html
     
  19. metacristi Registered Senior Member

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  20. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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  21. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    I have forgotten everything I learned about Quantum theory since 1951 when I took a graduate level course.

    In the past 10years, I have purchased & read several books on Quantum Theory.

    I highly recommend Quantum Reality by Nick Herbert for laymen
    who do not have the prerequisites background to cope with more serious college level texts.

    BTW: I can no longer cope with serious texts on this subject,
    although I can still do serious work with calculus, differential geometry, & other physics/math topics.
     
  22. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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    Quantum woo, like nails on a chalkboard.
     
  23. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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