Profanity why?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by Xelasnave.1947, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Why do some members use profanity as a default position?

    Is it not against the site rules?

    Does the user really think their argument gains in quality when it is apparent the opposite is more likely.

    Some here sound like children having a tantrum.

    Do they think they sound tuff and intimidating?

    Why use a bad word when with a small effort one could select a word that may offer a clear meaning.

    Seems rude, childish and lazy.

    Alex
     
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  3. Randwolf Ignorance killed the cat Valued Senior Member

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    Since you threaded the subject, I remembered that I wanted to mention to you that I would rather be fucked than damned. Horse or no...

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  5. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I think you illustrate there is a place in humour.
    As with generalisations, generally speaking, you can catch fish other than the target species.

    I suppose what I would like to see is the site to be a little bit better.

    May you get your preference.

    Alex
     
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  7. Michael 345 Valued Senior Member

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    By the horse or the Devil?

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  8. dsdsds Valued Senior Member

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    I think profanity is ok when used for humor or to convey a feeling of frustration when trying to make a point. The main problem with these online communities is the sheer lack of civility (profanity used or not) when debating different opinions.
     
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  9. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    I don't think that there is much correlation between civility and profanity. Also, it appears that not all English-speaking cultures react the same way. I am always amazed at how offended some people in the USA are with the slightest profanity - say "hell" and they will shoot you (that's OK). This maybe way off the reality, but that's the impression I get. Contrast with Yorkshire, UK, where "foook" is an obligatory interjection into every sentence.
     
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  10. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    from profane
    to
    profanity
    curious that
    from treating something sacred with disrespect
    to
    blasphemous or obscene language.

    OK
    I can get "God damn it"
    but then,
    "fucking" ?
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    6,611
    Sparingly, profanity can work as humour.
    Sparingly, profanity can enhance the message, much like emoticons do ("I am not merely angry, I'm really angry").

    But sometimes profanity is used when eloquence in communication fail. They are used like a baseball bat.

    Profanity is like exclamation marks; use either one gratuitously and the message loses it effectiveness. Continued misuse can cause the ineffectuality of the words to become an ineffectuality of the speaker!!!!!!!1
     
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  12. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    3,302
    Why not...

     
  13. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

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    6,606
    I dont know... i just know that i never find a need to cuss.!!!
     
  14. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    Due to decades of gratuitous overuse in even the formal information sphere, traditional profanity no longer has shock-value or serves as an adequate emotional purgative, anyway. It's all been demoted to "heck" and "darn" magnitude in terms of effect, apart from the extremely limited domain of (American) broadcast network censorship trying desperately to keep a couple of its once treasured words still taboo.

    Violations of political and empathetic correctness have taken over the "swift impact" function of classic types of impiety (i.e., that is what has the shock-value & the consequences now). Which is why an onlooker today has to hesitate a couple of instants to evaluate whether or not a person is just "cussing" / "having a fit" or they're someone who really does have a peacock tail of enmity / pathology splayed behind their buttocks. A novice SJW universally judging every instance of incorrectness as a maximum act of evil -- like the overzealous prudes of old did -- can face a modicum of embarrassment for some of their past self-righteousness when / if they develop in the future the cognitive maturity for distinguishing the two contexts.
     
  15. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I suppose I judge before a case is prosecuted but I find the defendants guilty of the crime of poor writing.

    Your writing is a pleasure which unfolds before one much like an interesting path passing by objects of wonder and your style illustrates the beauty of expression free of words that can take upon all and any meaning but require no ability to use but to me reveal a blunder.
    Alex
     
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  16. pluto2 Registered Senior Member

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    766
    The people on the Internet often come off as abusive.

    To give you an example in Gamespot a poster named Dabstight703 called me ugly and said that I can't hate pretty women just because I'm ugly.

    Many people on the people on the Internet are abusive and this is the reason why I stopped participating in online communities.

    Sometimes I think that the world would be better off if the Internet never existed. The Internet only creates more harm to people than good, especially if you're an ugly guy.
     
  17. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Yes. It's part of the language.
     
  18. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    Because freedom of speech is an enumerated right in our Constitution not subordinate to any other enumerated right, the freedom of religion in particular, and also because separation of church and state means that blasphemy is not considered treason. Most forms of profanity usually, but not always, involve taking the name of some deity or other in vain.

    Many graphic demonstrations at abortion clinics were profane in the extreme, and these people are not in the least concerned with the effect their desensitization has on others. They are also protected under the Constitution. Freedom from desensitization is not an enumerated right. Animal rights activists also seem to have this issue, and it is protected also. Some people only care about the rights of those unable to protect their rights, but are all too willing ignore real people and children less fortunate than themselves. Those without access to health care, for instance. They are more worried about dogs, and cats, and unborn fetuses. Anyone else have some profanity to spill about that?

    Politicians failing to perform on their respective oaths of office is, however tantamount to perjury and is not a protected form of speech or expression under our Constitution. These are worthy of some profanity, and also penalties appropriate to perjury.

    Freedom of speech / expression also protects the rights of those who would burn our national flag in public, or even those who would fly a Confederate or a foreign flag on American soil. As much as I might disagree with those who do these things, they have that right.

    Good enough for me. Lots of choices about what to be legally profane about suits me fine.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2017
  19. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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  20. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    I use this often, in the form of cursing and swearing at the Trump administration several times each day, and it helps. This probably explains why members of their administration do the same thing to both people like me, and also the Constitution.

    So, Ted Nugent handled the Obama administration in exactly the same way. Pretty enlightened, for someone still suffering from cat scratch fever!
     
  21. birch Valued Senior Member

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    3,778
    like with anything, it's how and when profanity is used. people can use profanity just to abuse and hurt others as well as demoralize/tear down/tarnish a person and/or situation. it isn't always good or right but i've also heard it used many times where it wasn't offensive much at all but rather funny effect. it's also an art in how and when it should be used to emphasize a point, also knowing when and why. not that everyone uses it for an appropriate intent at all times. i think people who use profanity a lot are very negative and come off as crass. i've done this many times online and am guilty of it. but i don't approve of this in myself either but i also don't feel that is the real me either. but for me, i think i swear more because i grew up not being able to express negativity, complain or defend myself as i was overly controlled to pretend everything was good/right when it wasn't but it was okay if they could curse though at me because they had more power so i tend to now make up for that by letting out all the garbage i've accumulated. not that is a good thing but that is why. i use to be a very idealistic, kind, ethical/moral and nice person. i am still ethical when it comes to important issues and deep inside i really do respect good values and people who exercise such. but i also don't think it's good if people pretend all is well or right when it isn't. too much rigidity is also not real. if someone is fair to you, it would be wrong to be profane with them but also you don't play nice with the proverbial devil or else you just get further chained and subjugated. it's all situational and there are people who will use profanity for ill intent and use it to make even a just or moral point.

    but it's true, there are people who use profanity just to hurt others or they are proud of that type of language and it's not something to be proud of at least. its like being proud of your dirty socks and flinging it at someone else. sometimes, profanity is necessary or helpful because it can be a good aggressive stance/defense with people who take kindness for weakness. so it all depends on the situation and the values of that individual in what motives and situations they use profanity.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2017
  22. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Freedom is not free. Freedoms & rights come with responsibilities. It seems most people do not know that.
     
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  23. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Many people are rude, childish & lazy online & off. But 1 person's profanity is another's normal language.
    Being offended or disturbed by it seems very silly to me. Very many, I suspect most, people talk 1 way in 1 time & place yet talk another way in others. Even as a child, I saw that there is no significant difference between darn it, dog gone it & damn it. Many parents use profanity around their children then stupidly punish the children for imitating them. I always thought bastard was used badly because it usually involved unfair prejudice & ill treatment of innocents. But it was a word with a definite meaning & was not considered profanity until so many people used it to refer to those were not bastards & it became another stupid insult.
    Most of profanity comes from things people do not want to talk about or hear about, stupid religious taboos & words the upper class decided were fit only for servants & pheasants. They mostly change over time. Your great great grandchildren probably will feel offended by words you think are OK & vice versa.
    I am writing a book on language & 1 section will be titled No Bad Words.

    <>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 12, 2017
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