Rising CO2 causes more than a climate crisis

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by paddoboy, Apr 22, 2020.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    https://phys.org/news/2020-04-co2-climate-crisisit-ability.html

    Rising CO2 causes more than a climate crisis—it may directly harm our ability to think
    by University of Colorado at Boulder

    As the 21st century progresses, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations will cause urban and indoor levels of the gas to increase, and that may significantly reduce our basic decision-making ability and complex strategic thinking, according to a new CU Boulder-led study. By the end of the century, people could be exposed to indoor CO2 levels up to 1400 parts per million—more than three times today's outdoor levels, and well beyond what humans have ever experienced.

    "It's amazing how high CO2 levels get in enclosed spaces," said Kris Karnauskas, CIRES Fellow, associate professor at CU Boulder and lead author of the new study published today in the AGU journal GeoHealth. "It affects everybody—from little kids packed into classrooms to scientists, business people and decision makers to regular folks in their houses and apartments."

    Shelly Miller, professor in CU Boulder's school of engineering and coauthor adds that "building ventilation typically modulates CO2 levels in buildings, but there are situations when there are too many people and not enough fresh air to dilute the CO2." CO2 can also build up in poorly ventilated spaces over longer periods of time, such as overnight while sleeping in bedrooms, she said.
    more at link..........

    the paper:

    https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019GH000237

    Fossil fuel combustion is driving indoor CO2 toward levels harmful to human cognition
    Abstract
    Human activities are elevating atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations to levels unprecedented in human history. The majority of anticipated impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions are mediated by climate warming. Recent experimental studies in the fields of indoor air quality and cognitive psychology and neuroscience, however, have revealed significant direct effects of indoor CO2 levels on cognitive function. Here we shed light on this connection, and estimate the impact of continued fossil fuel emissions on human cognition. We conclude that indoor CO2 levels may indeed reach levels harmful to cognition by the end of this century, and the best way to prevent this hidden consequence of climate change is to reduce fossil fuel emissions. Finally, we offer recommendations for a broad, interdisciplinary approach to improving such understanding and prediction.
     

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