Some photos

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Xelasnave.1947, Sep 23, 2019.

  1. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Well done.
    If you have a scope try using your phone camera...some are getting great results...I used to get rather decent Moon shots just holding a small digital camera to the EP.
    Alex
     
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  3. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Only in print and stored away somewhere in garage. Also I have disconnected my cam.
    Could maybe get some copies from printer but was just phase in my life and long forgotten.
    Used to have a Linhof 4x5, which I sold. Never did get a digital camera.
     
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  5. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    My Coronado is fairly small and lightweight and works well on my tracking mount for pics, however my telescope is a truss dobsonian and does not have a tracking system. Here's a pic of my telescope which I built back in 2004 and won an award for most innovative design. The upper and lower clamp system connecting the cage to the mirror box were hand carved from a block of bloodwood. Most of the rest is made from Baltic plywood.

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  7. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Very impressive.
    May I ask the size of the primary and the focal length?...also did you make the primary?
    I don't know if you are aware but you could take photos even with the scope stationary by using very short exposures and stacking multiple images..if you are in any way interested I could explain more.
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
  8. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    The focal length of the primary is 3.9, very fast mirror, and was made by Steve Swayze. https://www.swayzeoptical.com/

    I tried making images without a tracking system using RegiStax, but they always turned out quite blurry even though the primary puts out crystal sparking clear viewing. Someday, I may get around to either purchasing a tracking system for it or maybe building one from scratch, but there are so many great images already out there, I kind of thought not to bother and instead just use the telescope for viewing.
     
  9. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    8,185
    Nice and certainly fast.
    Registax will work for the Moon and planets but for Deep Sky you need "DeepskyStacker".
    My advice is stay with visual as toward the pointy end astro photography becomes very hard work.
    I do narrow band these days..generally 100 to 150 images in each of up to seven filters, each with say 25 dark frames, and in the future there will be 25 "flats" ...so seven groups to stack...then each stack is processed in "Startools" and those are each further proceeded and merged in Photoshop ...and my latest stuff is using data from two scopes...
    If you have a small equatorial mount the results one can get from a DSLR with a camera lens is very satisfying.
    Alex
     
  10. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    8,185
    This is an update on the image in post 84.
    Basically I started again cutting any data that hinted not being really decent, drizzled at 3x combined data from two scopes via Registar managed to get the four little stars you want so pretty happy..colour ..I let it have it's way..I tweaked to get detail rather than colour and when merged backed off over saturation. I had about 12 images each processed in Star tools to merge in photo shop..when each i.age comes into Photoshop I process each of the images before I add colour ( this is where I will highly saturate an image..now a lot of the image will degrade but usually a piece that is although colourful high in detail..I then merge it with another image where it has saturated detail but of another part..I do that for all the images and merge them to finally get one out of the twelve...then I play with that final image in Photoshop.. contrast maybe use the dodge tool to brighten a region or the burn tool to darken which rings out detail even better and maybe adjust the colour. Unfortunately I am colourblind so my colours can be offensive to certain astrophotographers...but so far this is the best I can do.
    I wanted more data with M42 using my new scope but I think it will be gone before I can do a thimg..this dark is cloudy.
    The I tetesting thing is no exposure used was longer than 30 seconds..but there were narrow band and DSLR images and even mono from the eight inch.
    So having cut out so much data the exposure for this image is only about two hours..maybe a little more..it's hard to keep track of what use sometimes..well it not I just didn't do it this time..which is unfortunate.
    Alex

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  11. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    A magnificent image, revealing the swirls and whirls in the cosmic clouds. On the left of the main cloud is that a smaller cloud with a big star in the middle?
     
  12. Jan Ardena OM!!! Valued Senior Member

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    I know this may sound stupid, but are those colours for real, or have you touched them up?
     
  13. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Here is the image maxed out which may help you answer your question..the image seems to come over much darker..but hopefully you can now see how that cloud joins in.
    Alex

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  14. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    No my interpretation is novel somewhat an artifact of pushing saturation and selecting that way..I just find I get more details but the colour can be basically wrong. However the "palette" used is arrived at by say assigning green for Ha or blue for oxygen..but I am only starting just getting to drive the processing to max..when this is applies to new data I plan being careful with colour..I can recolor stuff.
    It's touched up to the max..it's not easy wringing out this from 30 second exposures..plus no dark frames or flats..that in the next level.
    Alex
     
  15. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    All these images I finally merge in Photoshop come is as black and white.
    Say we have one taken with the Ha filter ..in photo shop you colour it green so the Ha regions show as green in your image...and you have seven groups, which you colour up ..the filters enable you to image only that light.
    Alex
     
  16. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Taking pictures of the universe as it was thousands (millions?) of light years distance and in the past, is just mind boggling.
    The grandeur humbles the mind.
     
  17. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    The Orion Nebula is only 1300 odd light years. Here 2 million light years for you..M31 approx two million years ago.
    Alex.
    Alex

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  18. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Astounding. Then to see the background just makes it almost incomprehensible. We see it, but it is beyond human comprehension. There is nothing to mentally associate it with.

    Our sun might be one of those little dots, for all we know.
     
  19. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Each dot is a Sun the smeres of light are Suns.
    Here is a small section of our galaxy with a galaxy to the right only..mmm I think about 170000 light years.
    And event at 2 million light years nothing...Observable universe 90 billion light years diameter.
    Alex
     
  20. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    The slightly larger patch of light in the middle of the Milky Way as shown in the last above image....is this image below..note the dots are Suns.
    Alex

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  21. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Just defies any human experience.
     
  22. Jan Ardena OM!!! Valued Senior Member

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    It looks really pretty.
    What does it look like without the touch-ups?
     
  23. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Much the same, most the processing is to wipe out background gradient, and most of all noise so you are trying to bring out the actual image and separate it from artificial stuff like noise and haze...
    Alex
     

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