Tightenable

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Steve100, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    If something can be tightened then it has the property of being tightenable.
    However as far as I can find; "tightenable" is not a real word.

    What word could I use, or what is the shortest phrase I could use otherwise?

    Also, I don't necessarily mean the opposite of loose.
     
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  3. spidergoat Speak of the Devil Valued Senior Member

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    What's wrong with loose? Anything loose is has the possibility of being tightened.
     
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  5. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    I like the specificity of tightenable.
    also
    (the dictionary in here doesn't seem to mind the word tightenable)
     
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  7. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    as/re the ak47:
    "The integrated gas piston and bolt carrier's parts were designed to fit loosely in the receiver, making the mechanism less susceptible to the effects of carbon buildup, rust and dirt—and thus less prone to jamming. Kalashnikov claimed credit for these ideas, but they were actually adopted from other Soviet designs of the time, including Alexey Sudayev's AS-44. After Sudayev died in 1946, his "loose fit" concept was used by other designers."

    It seems we have an instance of:
    Loose, but not tightenable.
     
  8. spidergoat Speak of the Devil Valued Senior Member

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    You could always design it with tighter tolerances.
     
  9. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Adjustable.
     
  10. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    True:
    However: The design goal was a weapon that could withstand the carbon build-up, dust and dirt and rust of prolonged field use.
    and
    it works
    and, i suspect, it is what gives the rifle it's distinctive bark.

    As/re adjustable.
    Last year I had to adjust the sights on the rifle. 40 clicks to move the crosshair from left to right----------wow.
    And then when I had adjusted the scope to the barrel, I tightened all.
    Tightenable really seems the most specific.
    I like it.
     
  11. karenmansker HSIRI Registered Senior Member

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    590
    For screws: Rotationally tensionable (tic!)
     
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  12. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Drop the rotationally, and tensionable seems a match for tightenable?
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Adjustable is less specific - which is why I like it.

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    Does tightenable also include loosenable? Or is it a one-way street?
     
  14. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    24,644
    The modern English language--especially here in the USA--is quite flexible. It is quite common to coin new words, so long as their meanings are easily understood.

    I'm certain that no adult American would have any trouble at all understanding the meaning of "tightenable," so whether or not it's in the dictionary is unimportant. No one is going to bother looking it up!

    That said... it is a rather awkward word, so it will probably not become very popular.
     
  15. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    If something like a knot in a rope or a shoelace is tightenable, then it is possible for it to become more frictionally and compactly compressed or convoluted by means of pulling on the ends. But if a belt buckle or a nylon zip tie is tightenable, it simply means that whatever is bound by it is compressible.

    A budget that is tightenable may have little to do with compression of wallets and by proxy belts, but suggests starvation as a means of further compression in situations where no more tightening is currently possible.
     
  16. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    In colloquial everyday American English, we coin words all the time that are not in the dictionary.

    I can assure you that if you speak or write the word "tightenable," absolutely everyone who hears it or sees it will understand what you mean. Furthermore, I'm sure that only a very small percentage of those people are going to stop and say (to themselves, if not to you), "Hey, that's not a real word!"

    I'm the Linguistics Moderator, which means that I have at least a modest set of credentials, and even I had to look it up. But if you used it in a sentence (written or spoken)outside of this website, I would not have launched into a discourse about making up words. We all do it.

    I don't know if this is common in the other Anglophone countries. The Aussies are even more informal than us Americans, so I'd expect them to do it. The Brits? They might do it in very informal settings, but probably not in writing.
    Of course. Just because something is loose, that doesn't automatically imply that it can be tightened or retightened. The reason that the gadget in question is loose may be that it's worn out and some of the pieces simply won't turn anymore!
     
  17. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I find the word tightenable very useibly.
    Alex
     

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