Galactic Dark Matter

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by Contemplation, Feb 19, 2023.

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  1. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    As I understand it, physics in the modern era is very much a collaborating endeavour. Nobody is likely to get very far working in isolation.

    Are you a physicist?
    Hardly dumbstruck.

    On the contrary, I have asked you probably 50 questions by now. You've attempted to answer just one or two of them, and you have ignored the rest.

    Maybe you're the one who is dumbstruck. Something to think about.
    I thought you wanted to discuss these things. If you don't, that's fine. I'll leave you to it if you'd prefer.
    One would think they'd be easy to answer, then.

    Why won't you answer them?
     
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  3. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Dark matter isn't a force.
    It's already expected it will do that in 4 billion years or so.
    Can you give any reasons why anybody else should believe any of this?
     
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  5. Contemplation Registered Senior Member

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    Dark matter isn’t a force? It seems you have finally pointed out a real reason why you don’t agree with what I said. I find it surprising that you have chosen this one. I thought how this was supposed to work. If people agree or don’t have a solid reason to disagree with it, then they don’t mention anything about a concept they don’t like.

    It seems like you are still overreacting to this. The reason behind what I say is because I believe that dark matter is from the proper time not being Lorentz Invariant. If you want to actually discuss that then we should start there. I believe that is the main issue clouding your judgement about this, or whatever you seen me post about in another thread.

    The Lorentz Factor is the inverse in the proper time. The maths do not work out.
     
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  7. Contemplation Registered Senior Member

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    In the video I posted, it talks about the history of competing models physicist used to describe the large scale structure of the universe. There was the pancake model, meatball model, and the sponge model. Did these physicist actually believe that the universe was actually made of pancakes, meatballs, and sponges? No, absolutely not.

    The reason behind this was that the situation was just too complex, and they actually didn’t know the real reason behind the large scale structure problem. The models are just guidelines that they follow to give a close approximation of it. Dark matter is actually just a description that makes one of these approximations more accurately fit the data.
     
  8. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Contemplation:
    The hint is right there in the name: dark matter. Not dark force. Matter is not a force.
    Either you're using the term "proper time" in an idiosyncratic way, or you don't understand what it is. But I have asked you what you mean by it, and that's just one of the hundred questions I put to you that you have failed to answer.
    What does that even mean? What do you mean by "inverse"? Do you mean "reciprocal"? If that's what you mean, then you're wrong, because the Lorentz factor is dimensionless. It does not have dimensions of reciprocal time.

    Are you going to address the questions I asked you previously, or not?
     
  9. Contemplation Registered Senior Member

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    How can you be so sure?
    What are you even talking about?
    How do you want me to explain this?
     
  10. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Because I have spent quite some time learning stuff about physics.
    Your claim that "The Lorentz Factor is the inverse in the proper time."

    Wasn't that clear?
    A simple "yes" or "no" is all that is required.
     
  11. Contemplation Registered Senior Member

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    Ah, I get it now. We actually live in a giant version of SpongeBob SquarePants that lives in a bubble under the sea, so this proves that the missing dark matter is actually matter that we cannot see. I should have went over what is actually the current science first, instead of jumping to random conclusions.
     
  12. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    This thread is going nowhere. It is now closed.
     
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