Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    30,994
    Let's go with "fees":
    You wouldn't pay "for" your fees, but pay your fees. You are paying "for" your golf club membership, something you receive upon paying for it. The fees are the payment itself - you wouldn't pay "for" a payment.
     
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  3. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Are golf membership fees ongoing and is that why it is not "fee"? Or if they are itemized? "Fee" seems quite an unusual usage in most cases.

    "pay your dues" exists ,so why not "pay your fees"? (ignore that , I did not address your "for" point)
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
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  5. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    Somewhere perhaps is the idea that "fees" are a charge for various services included in being a member of a golf club. Similarly, in the UK you used to pay "rates" for a house, and they included several services such as rubbish collection and water supply. But a single item is singular, such as income tax and council tax. I don't really think it makes much difference.
     
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  7. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    That is a correct use of the word, but it's not used very often. Proper usage requires a patient to spend at least one night in the hospital before he can be called an "inpatient."
    Yes. "Chiropractor" and "chiropractic" came into use around 1900.
    No. Chiropractors are not medical doctors ("M.D."), so they do not have the education, the skill or the authority to perform surgery--almost any kind of surgery.

    Your spinal cord is one of the most important parts of your body. Even most M.D.'s do not have the training and ability to perform spinal surgery! If the surgeon makes a mistake, you could end up as a paraplegic, unable to use your legs and feet for the rest of your life. You might not even be able to control your bladder.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
  8. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    However, there have also been a few occasions which have seen prime ministers who - like Theresa May - made it to Downing Street without winning an election themselves going to the country for a "personal mandate".


    personal mandate = means what?
     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    The word "mandate" is used in a variety of ways, but one of the most common is a command from the citizens of a country to their government, giving them an order to do something that the citizens regard as extremely necessary.

    A personal mandate is merely a command to one person in the government, who has the ability and the authority to give the order.

    However, note that in both cases, the people who receive the mandate may not be legally required to execute it.
     
  10. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    I have never seen people using irregardless before.
    Have you?
    Can you form a sentence of it?
     
  11. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    DISINTERESTED = not biased? Is it a legal term?
     
  12. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Why enormity is not the noun of enormous? Totally different meaning.
     
  13. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    4,752
    LIEUTENANT = Do you pronounce it as leftenant or loo-tenant?
     
  14. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    4,752
    It says that:
    Well, while “abash” does exist (it means to embarrass or perplex), it hasn’t been widely used for centuries.
    The negative version, unabashed, on the other hand, is used today and means “not embarrassed”.

    Why people seldom use abash?
     
  15. Equinox Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    106
    Even as an outpatient you still receive treatment inside the hospital

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    'Admitted' just means you are given a bed to stay in over night (or a period of nights) and yes if you are given a bed to stay in you become an 'inpatient': https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inpatient

    So you could say: "The outpatient was impatient to become an inpatient."
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017
  16. Equinox Registered Senior Member

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    106
    In the UK it's pronounced Left, in the USA its pronounce Lieu.
     
  17. Equinox Registered Senior Member

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    106
    To be fair I have never heard anyone use the word 'unabashed' in a normal conversation, I have only ever seen the word used in a books (where obscure words tend to crop up much more frequently as authors like to use a variety of words to describe a scene).

    I would also guess that (when it is used) Unabashed rolls off the tongue more easily and is more lyrical then 'Unembarrassed'.
     
  18. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    169
    That's odd - I've certainly heard it. Not often, though.
     
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    In the British parliamentary system, The Prime Minister is the leader of the largest party in the House of Commons. The party can replace its leader at any time, so Theresa May is Prime Minister even though the voters didn't expect her to be Prime Minister during the last general Election. If she wins the upcoming general election, she will have a "personal mandate' - that is, she will have the endorsement of the people as Prime Minister.
     
  20. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    It's almost impossible to answer a question like this. The word has been out of use for more than 400 years. Today, we prefer words like "embarrassed," or "perplexed," which have the same meaning.
     
  21. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    You think "embarrassed" and "perplexed" have the same meaning???
    And no, the word has not been out of use for more than 400 years. It is not a common word, granted, but it is still used. At least on this side of the linguistic divide.

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  22. Equinox Registered Senior Member

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    I think they were saying that 'abashed' (another word for 'embarrassed') has synonyms relating to 'perplexed', 'confounded' ect. but that we use more specific words to describe these feelings now.

    https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1CAHPZY_enGB609GB609&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=define abashed
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
  23. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    When it comes to China, has US President Donald Trump played a diplomatic master stroke?

    diplomatic master stroke = mean what?
     

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